Miley Cyrus: Voice Profile and Vocal Range (2022)

Vocal Range: G2 – G#5 – E6 (3 octaves and a major sixth)[1]While this is the range of her voice over her entire career, her range at any given time was and is likely narrower than this range; https://therangeplanet.proboards.com/thread/343/miley-cyrus

Vocal Fach: Lyric Mezzo-Soprano

Vocal Rating: Singer-Vocalist

Analysis: Despite often being discussed for her controversial performances and style, Miley Cyrus is first and foremost a talented singer. Growing up within the music industry, Cyrus received vocal lessons at a young age, helping to capture her talent and potential. Her unique tone, rasp, and musical style make her voice instantly recognizable and versatile, truly finding its home in Country and Rock stylings. Over the course of her 15-year career, Cyrus’s voice has undergone significant changes due to damage and stress, but she has adapted her style and delivery to better meet these challenges.

Cyrus has an impressively resonant and healthy lower register, especially since her voice underwent its first significant change around 2014. Where C3s are usually difficult or outright impossible for most female singers, Cyrus sings them with ease, even making them sound like middle register notes. The lower register is achieved (mostly) without lowering the larynx and she is able to project down into a tenor’s range at G2. She is able to stay in and around the 2nd octave for extensive periods without issue. Because of this, Cyrus is understandably often labeled as a contralto, but she’s still best labeled as a mezzo-soprano. Her timbre is still womanly, lacking the true androgynous character of a contralto even in her lower register. By Pop standards, she may be considered a contralto, and she could certainly sing an alto (or even tenor) choral part if given one. At present, she best fits the mezzo label, as vocal range is only one factor in determining vocal fach.[2]For more, read our Vocal Classifications & Fachs page.

Her middle and upper registers contain solid breath support up to B4, demonstrating a beautiful, natural rolling vibrato when relaxed, while her upper-chest register is achieved with great stamina, as she is also able to stay in this register for extended periods (see MTV Unplugged’s “Why’d You Only Call Me When You’re High?”). However, she carries a very heavy sound in this area and often pushes for volume, when it would best serve the longevity of her instrument if she brightened the sound by mixing more with her head voice. She additionally keeps her tongue slightly lifted to alter the color of her voice even though it is likely not the most technically sound placement. Still, the sound produced is relatively open, and over recent years she has ventured less outside of her tessitura. Although underutilized, her falsetto reached up to E6 with ease in early recordings and she’s also shown that she can access the whistle register, although it’s uncontrolled.

But what happened to cause Miley Cyrus’s voice to change? Unfortunately, the metamorphosis her voice undertook is the result of vocal damage. She has spoken openly about some vocal health issues, most notably Reinke’s Edema, a condition where fluid builds and subsequently swells in the vocal cords. This causes the speed of vibrations in the vocal cords to slow and subsequently lower one’s voice, as well as create a gravelly sound. The affliction is often caused by vocal abuse, whether poor singing or excessive talking and/or smoking. For Cyrus, not only did she begin heavy, professional touring around the age of 13, she also began smoking consistently in her late teens and early 20s. These factors all contributed to the change and degradation of her voice, which had to be rectified with surgery.[3]For more: What Happened to Miley Cyrus’ Voice? What is Reinke’s Edema?

Overall, Cyrus is a proficient singer whose experiences are clearly shown in the quality of her voice. While she was more reckless with her voice due to personal decisions and factors outside of her control earlier on, she has been forced to take better care of her instrument, and her discipline shows. While she could still utilize better techniques, like most pop musicians, Cyrus values artistic expression over technical perfection and is developing a balance that works for her.

What do you think of Miley Cyrus’ voice? Would you add anything to our analysis? Let us know by commenting below!

What is Miley Cyrus’s vocal range?

Miley Cyrus’s vocal range is three octaves and a major sixth, just shy of four octaves, spanning G2 – G#5 – E6.

What is Miley Cyrus’s voice type, classification or vocal fach?

Miley Cyrus is a Mezzo-Soprano. Contraltos are exceptionally rare because of their androgynous vocal quality, and Cyrus’s timbre is womanly, lacking a true androgynous character even in her lower register, and she still naturally shines in a mezzo’s tessitura.

How many octaves can Miley Cyrus sing?

Miley Cyrus’s can sing three octaves and a major sixth, just shy of four octaves, spanning G2 – G#5 – E6.

Is Miley Cyrus a contralto?

Miley Cyrus is a Mezzo-Soprano. Contraltos are exceptionally rare because of their androgynous vocal quality, and Cyrus’s timbre is womanly, lacking a true androgynous character even in her lower register, and she still naturally shines in a mezzo’s tessitura.

Is MIley Cyrus an alto?

Miley Cyrus is a Mezzo-Soprano. Contraltos are exceptionally rare because of their androgynous vocal quality, and Cyrus’s timbre is womanly, lacking a true androgynous character even in her lower register, and she still naturally shines in a mezzo’s tessitura. The term “Alto” specifically refers to a choral part, and her voice is low enough that she could certainly sing an alto part effectively.

References

References
1 While this is the range of her voice over her entire career, her range at any given time was and is likely narrower than this range; https://therangeplanet.proboards.com/thread/343/miley-cyrus
2 For more, read our Vocal Classifications & Fachs page.
3 For more: What Happened to Miley Cyrus’ Voice? What is Reinke’s Edema?

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